Red Carpet: The Italians Take on the Met Gala

Italy. The home of the Catholic Church, the mecca of Catholic art, and the birthplace of some of the fashion houses most equipped to take on this years theme. Let’s take a look at how they fulfilled or flaked on that promise.

Also, a side note: this is our 100th post here at Fashion Wonk! I just wanted to take a moment to thank everyone for reading, commenting, and encouraging me to keep this thing going! It’s been a joy talking fashion with you all, so thank you very, very much.

Lana del Rey and Jared Leto in Gucci

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Well then. This is not subtle. As I understand it, this is an ode to “Our Lady of Sorrows”, a.k.a the Virgin Mary and the suffering she experienced. And obviously Jared Leto is dressed as Jesus. Which is pretty much a regular Monday for him.

Susie Bick and Nick Cave in Gucci

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Susie clearly thought, “Lana, I take your Virgin Mary, and raise you a LITERAL medieval nun’s habit”. I would believe you if you told me this was actually extremely vintage and not Gucci at all.

Cardi B in Moschino

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Boy, has Cardi B been having a year! With a baby due in July, we can expect Cardi to likely leave the spotlight for a while this summer, and what a high note to end on. She and creative director Jeremy Scott went all out on the theme, creating a glittering concoction of medieval influences befitting her rank as the current Queen of Rap.

Stella Maxwell in Moschino

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Moschino nailed Stella’s look as well with a gilded gown covered in Renaissance era depictions of the Madonna.

Princess Beatrice of York in Alberta Ferretti

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My worlds colliding: a royal at the Met Gala! Bea looks lovely in this purple Alberta Ferretti, although the thematic connection is tenuous. Imagine the royal scandal if she had gone full-Rihanna though?! Sigh. We can always hope she’ll bring the same hat drama to Harry and Meghan’s wedding that she brought to Will and Kate’s!

Huma Abedin in Giambattista Valli

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This is pretty but has less than nothing to do with the theme. Although after the last few years poor Huma has had, I think we can all cut her some slack.

Sarah Jessica Parker in Dolce & Gabbana 

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Like Rihanna, SJP always goes all out for the Met Gala. She’s also often incorporates elaborate headwear into her looks, from her Chinese themed headdress in 2015, to her Punk mohawk in 2013. She didn’t disappoint this year – she topped her elaborately embroidered Dolce & Gabbana gown with an enormous headdress containing its own nativity scene. This is the level of commitment I look for at the Met Gala and I bow down to her sense of adventure.

Emilia Clarke in Dolce & Gabbana

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Besides Versace, Dolce & Gabbana were the other most obvious designer choice for this years theme. They often use religious iconography in their work, from the obvious cherubs, crosses, and Virgin Mary’s, to their general gilded and Renaissance aesthetic. I love this – she may (possibly) be Queen of Westeros soon, but she’s full Renaissance Queen here.

Anya Taylor Joy in Dolce & Gabbana

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Gorgeous, but on this particular night, the weakest of the D&G offerings.

Darren Criss in Dolce & Gabbana

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I will always applaud a man who commits to the theme. Like Chadwick, Darren looks fantastic.

Frances McDormand in Valentino

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Well damn, Frances! A longtime devotee of Valentino (she wore a custom look to accept her Oscar, and I had pegged a red look from their latest season for her in my fantasy stylist post) she went with a totally kooky, perfect-for-her, voluminous confection from their Spring 2018 collection. Complete with an utterly insane Philip Treacy hat, this is a totally over the top take on ecclesiastical robes. Oh, and it’s also pants underneath the cloak. I don’t even care – this made me laugh and cemented the fact that while she’s clearly nuts, she’s definitely the fun kind of nuts.

Cynthia Erivo in Valentino

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I am not a fan of this. The color is sumptuous, but the modesty bar across her chest is a tired trope and the jeweled eyebrows feel disconnected and strange. However, her nail art very elaborately depicted “The Creation of Adam” re-imagined with two black women, which is fucking dope and an excellent touch.

Anne Hathaway in Valentino

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A totally fine and rather voluminous take on Cardinals robes, the real standout here is her spiked headdress.

Bee Shaffer in Valentino

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I have been eagerly waiting for someone to wear this gown. Bee is always one of the best dressed Met Gala attendees, although, like her mother Anna Wintour, she rarely adheres to the theme.

Katherine Langford in Prada

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I like the pink and red together, and the cape is neat. Totally acceptable, but nothing to write home about.

Amanda Seyfried in Prada

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Stunning – she looks like she stepped right out of a Raphaelite painting.

Rita Ora in Prada

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So…what’s with the bag? Nice gown and a cool headdress, but the bag looks straight out of the Queen Elizabeth II collection of practical handbags.

Sarah Paulson In Prada

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Eh…I expect more from Sarah. Her style is always dramatic, intriguing, and often dark. I was surprised and disappointed to see her exploring the lighter “heavenly” aspects of the theme, rather than some of the darker elements.

Dakota Fanning in Miu Miu

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Come on, Dakota. You can do better than this.

One thought on “Red Carpet: The Italians Take on the Met Gala

  1. Molly, this stunning achievment and labor of love gets better and better with every posting. You totally crack me up and your knowledge, connections and insights are so impressive. I hope Pope Francis is a reader , he should be! As should Anna Wintour! What’s up with Lynda Carter? Is she a member of the tribe?

    Like

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